For Over 30 Years, Long Island's Leading Organization Dedicated to Preventing Bullying and Child Abuse

Are you a bystander or an upstander?

At some time, every kid becomes a bystander—someone who witnesses bullying but doesn’t get involved.

You can be an upstander instead—the person who knows what’s happening is wrong and does something to make things right.  It takes courage to speak up on someone’s behalf.  But just think: by doing so, you are becoming a person of character and also helping someone else.

Here are some things you can safely do:

  • Don’t join in the bullying
  • Support the victim in private—show your concern and offer kindness
  • Stand with the victim and say something
  • Mobilize others to join in and stand up to the bully
  • Befriend the victim and reach out to him/her in friendship
  • Alert an adult

Do not worry – you are not ratting the bully out by telling an adult.  There’s a big difference between tattling and reporting a concern. Tattling is telling to get someone in trouble, reporting is telling to get someone out of trouble.

Remember Martin Luther King Jr.’s words: “In the end we will not remember the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.”

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